Our Services

Cosmetic Dentistry

  • Porcelain Veneers
  • Crowns (Porcelain-Metal or All Porcelain)
  • Bonding Composite (Tooth-colored fillings)
  • Dental face lift & TMJ Pain & Dysfunction
  • Implants
  • Teeth Whitening
  • Cosmetic Recontouring
  • Gum Recontouring

General Dentistry

  • Bridges (Porcelain Metal or Metal-Free)
  • Composite Resin (tooth colored fillings)
  • Root Canal Therapy
  • Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment
  • Dentures (Full or Partial)
  • Children’s Dentistry
  • Custom Dental Appliances for snoring, teeth grinding, bite irregularities and resulting headaches
  • Treatment for Bad Breath
  • Teeth Cleaning
  • Fluoride Treatment
  • Sealants

Common Problems That We Treat

  • Difficulty or painful chewing
  • Broken or worn-down teeth
  • Headaches, neck aches, or shoulder pain
  • Clicking or popping of jaw joints
  • Soreness or tenderness of facial or jaw muscles
  • Grinding teeth while sleeping or clenching of teeth when stressed
  • Custom Dental Appliances for snoring, teeth grinding, bite irregularities and resulting headaches
  • Awkward or unappealing smile
  • Difficulty in speech










Common Dental Myths

Filled, bonded, crowned or veneered teeth will not decay.
Brushing and flossing after eating sugar will prevent decay.
Decay stops after the teenage years.
Tooth decay or gum disease are genetic and not under your control.
It is normal to lose and/or wear down your teeth with age.
Clenching and grinding teeth are caused by stress.
Gum recession and notches of teeth at gumline are normal.
Jaw joints that pop, click, or grate are normal.
If there is no pain, there is no problem.
Your jaw joints and teeth work independently of each other.
Abscessed teeth, tooth decay, and gum disease always show up on X-rays.
False teeth (dentures) chew as well as natural teeth.
Teeth with a root canal will not decay.

Filled, bonded, crowned or veneered teeth will not decay.

Fact: Even the best fitting crown, bonded, veneered, or filled tooth is not as good as a natural, healthy tooth. All restorations have a margin where tooth and restorative material meet. Each margin is a potential risk factor for invasion of plaque / bacterial growth, causing decay, if not maintained properly.

Brushing and flossing after eating sugar will prevent decay.

Fact: Acids form immediately when a sugary food is placed in the mouth, which immediately begins deterioration of tooth structure and causing cavity. Thorough cleaning (i.e. brushing, flossing, and irrigating) help reduce plaque buildup, but regular dental checkups and xrays are necessary for early detection and treatment of any damage.

Decay stops after the teenage years.

Fact: Many factors effect tooth decay. It is true that in the teen years decay is more prevalent. However, there can be an increase of tooth decay at any age, due to: diet and eating sugary foods, deep crevices of the tooth surfaces, the lack of proper homecare, along with taking medications that dry the saliva (a natural buffer), and poor or ill fitting restorations.

Tooth decay or gum disease are genetic and not under your control.

Fact: Eliminating tooth decay requires effective daily plaque removal, a good diet, and regular professional assessment of daily hygiene effectiveness. There are several factors associated with gum disease: homecare (removal of plaque and bacteria), genetics/heredity, nutrition, exercise (circulation), stress, systemic factors (e.g., diabetes), the use of tobacco, and abnormal biting. Dental restorations, orthodontic braces, partials, and bridges potentially increase the risk of difficulty in effective plaque removal.

It is normal to lose and/or wear down your teeth with age.

Fact: Tooth enamel should last 120 years. When the jaw joints are properly aligned in the socket, and all of the teeth meet at the same time and properly function when chewing, excessive wear does not occur. Trauma and infections are the major causes of tooth loss, while improper form and function are the major causes for excessive wear.

Clenching and grinding teeth are caused by stress.

Fact: Clenching and grinding are symptoms of a bigger problem. The way the teeth come together when the jaw is NOT properly positioned in the socket causes clenching and grinding. The system (jaw joints, muscles, and teeth) is designed to position the joints. Through muscle function, the joints are properly positioned in the socket. If not properly aligned, the teeth get in the way of the joint positioning, creating a 'tug of war' experienced as clenching and grinding. Stress does not cause the problem, rather tends to worsen it or make it more noticable.

Gum recession and notches of teeth at gumline are normal.

Fact: Shrinking gums (recession) and notching at the gumline (abfractions) are signs of improper and excess forces on the teeth and gums from a system that is out of balance. While brushing with a stiff brush and abrasive toothpaste can aggravate the gum tissue and root surface, it is not the cause.

Jaw joints that pop, click, or grate are normal.

Fact: Noises in any joint are a sign of a problem. The jaw joint is no exception. Healthy joints do not make noise.

If there is no pain, there is no problem.

Fact: In the mouth, teeth or jaw joints pain is often a sign that damage or a problem has worsened, requiring more extensive treatment. In many cases irreversible damage and pain could have been avoided if earlier, proper diagnosis and treatment had occurred. Beginning stages of periodontal (gum) disease, tooth decay, mouth cancers, tooth wear, cracked teeth, abscessed teeth, cysts in the jaw, and joint dysfunction often progress with no overt pain until major destruction has occurred. Further these are ALL indications of more serious problems.

Your jaw joints and teeth work independently of each other.

Fact: The muscles, jaw joints, and teeth work together as a system. When one is out of balance, the whole system is altered and compromised, causing damage to selective parts.

Abscessed teeth, tooth decay, and gum disease always show up on X-rays.

Fact: X-rays show more extensive decay, abscesses, and excessive bone loss. Early stages often do not show up due to the lower amount of radiation in today's units. The mouth is three dimensional – x-rays only show on a flat plane (two dimensional) which means xrays alone do not give all the information needed.

False teeth (dentures) chew as well as natural teeth.

Fact: Bone changes shape after teeth are lost, making it difficult to secure a close fitting denture. When dentures and partial dentures are ill fitting, mastication (chewing) is compromised. This can lead to digestive problems, jaw joint dysfunction, and mouth cancers. Natural teeth are secured IN bone; dentures fit ON TOP of the bone and therefore are only 20-30% effective in chewing.

Teeth with a root canal will not decay.

Fact: Teeth with root canals can decay; only the nerve has been removed. These teeth still have enamel and dentin surfaces that can decay. As long as there are tooth surfaces and bacteria and sugar present, decay CAN occur.